About

FAQs

Curatorial

Can I take pictures in the Museum?

You are welcome to take photographs of the Museum and its collection and grounds using hand-held or video cameras only, under the following guidelines.


Why can’t I touch the art?

Oil and acid on our fingers leave damaging deposits on the surface of art, whether it is a painting, print, or sculpture. These deposits lead to chemical degradation on the artwork surface over a period of time. We want to preserve these important works of art for many future generations. Please help us by not touching paintings, prints, or sculptures.


May I talk to a curator?

Our curator is extremely busy, so an appointment is absolutely necessary. Please send a brief message via our contact form with your question. We will make sure that it gets to the appropriate staff person and that your inquiry is answered in a timely fashion.


How do I donate an artwork to the Museum?

We are happy to review the object with our acquisitions committee to determine if the artwork fits our collection policies. Please email a digital photo to info@wildlifeart.org with information about the piece you would like to donate. You may also send a photograph with any pertinent details to:

Curator of Art
National Museum of Wildlife Art
PO Box 6825
Jackson, WY 83002

Please do not bring your artwork to the Museum without a confirmed appointment with a member of our curatorial staff.


Does the Museum buy art?

Occasionally we will consider art for purchase. Please contact us via info@wildlifeart.org with information about the piece you are interested in selling. Include information telling us about the object, how you acquired the piece, and a digital photo. You may also send a
photograph with any pertinent details to:

Curator of Art
National Museum of Wildlife Art
PO Box 6825
Jackson, WY 83002

Please do not bring your artwork to the Museum without a confirmed appointment with a member of our curatorial staff.


I found a painting in my grandmother’s house. Is it real? What’s it worth?

An auction resource like Christie’s or Sotheby’s – or even online auction sites like Ebay.com or ArtPrice.com can help you learn more about the value of your object. The National Museum of Wildlife Art does not perform identifications, authentications, or valuations. You can find a certified appraiser in your area at Appraisers.org or AppraiserofFineArt.com.


I am an artist. Would I be able to have an exhibit at the Museum?

Solo exhibitions are extremely rare. You may send information about your art and digital images or links to online portfolios to the curator through our contact form.


Where can I learn more about a specific artist or type of art?

There are many different ways to learn about art. Online, you can search our website and other sites like Artcyclopedia.com or Askart.com. Your local library is also a great resource. Librarians are great at getting hard-to-find information.


I have an artwork that needs to be cleaned. Whom should I call?

You can find information on selecting a conservator for your artwork on The American Institute for Conservation Web site.


I need to have a work of art framed. Can you recommend someone?

There are many matting and framing companies. The American Institute for Conservation can tell you what kinds of materials you can request for the best protection of your art. More information found at the American Institute for Conservation Web site.


I need to move a large painting or sculpture. How do I do it?

There are a number of companies that specialize in art handling and ship locally and nationwide. Some of them are: FremontFrameworks.comUSArt.comArtexfas.com,
Atelier4.com, or Bonsai-FineArts.com. The Museum does not endorse any particular art handling and shipping companies.