Collection

About the Collection

Collection Highlights

In the Forest c. 1880, Oil on Canvas
Albert Bierstadt Germany, immigrated to United States 1832, 1830 - 1902
The Peaceable Kingdom 1822 - 1825, Oil on Canvas
Edward Hicks United States, 1780 - 1849
Two Lions, After Peter Paul Rubens c. 1820, Oil on Canvas
Theodore Gericault France, 1791 - 1824
Tiger Observing Cranes c. 1890, Oil on Canvas/Panel
Jean-Leon Gerome France, 1824 - 1904
Hanging Grouse c. 1890, Oil on Canvas
Alexander Pope United States, 1849 - 1924
Spring Antelope 1982, Oil on Board
Ken Carlson United States, 1937 -
King of the Forest n.d., Pastel on Paper
Rosa Bonheur France, 1822 - 1899
Forest Primeval c. 1940, Oil on Board
Gerard Curtis Delano United States, 1890 - 1972
African Black Rhino with Tick Birds (The Battleship of the Plains) 1912, Bronze
James Lippit Clark United States, 1883 - 1969
Wingmead 1943, Oil on Canvas
Richard E. Bishop United States, 1887 - 1975
Creature Comforts 2000, Riverstone
Steve Kestrel United States, 1947 -
So You Wanna Get Married, Eh? 1886, Oil on Canvas
William Holbrook Beard United States, 1824 - 1900
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The National Museum of Wildlife Art Collection features more than 550 artists and over 5,000 catalogued items. Dating from 2500 b.c. to the present, the collection chronicles much of the history of wildlife in art, focusing primarily on European and American painting and sculpture. Our collection of American art from the 19th and 20th centuries is particularly strong, recording European exploration of the American West. Many of these works predate photography, making them vital representations of the frontier era in the history of the United States.

The collection covers various genres including explorer art, sporting art, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Modernism. The Museum also includes a wide variety of media, such as oil, bronze, stone, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, pastel, pencil, lithography, photography, and charcoal.

As the museum moves into its third decade, the scope of the collection is broadening to include wildlife art from around the world. Recent acquisitions include works from Africa and New Zealand.