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CallOfTheWild_2015_2016

every scrap of information I could find. Then I would call and say something like, “I am an artist doing this project, some of which is in your field and I’d like to find out more about what you do.” Because a lot of this scientific work is esoteric, many scientists were amazed that someone outside their field would contact them. 30 National Museum of Wildlife Art | WildlifeArt.org Then, I would follow their advice. I used maps, GPS coordinates or would find someone who could take me. I was looking for continuously living individuals—both single units and those living in colonies, like aspen trees. COTW: What were the parameters of this project? RS: I started at “Year Zero” and looked back. This is to remind ourselves that our timekeeping is incredibly arbitrar y and incredibly shallow. In this project, I am exploring both biologic and geologic time. COTW: What were your feelings as you photographed? Did the oldest living things become “people” to you? Did you humanize them? RS: Yes. The basic idea of anthropomorphizing them took a bit of courage. And it took a bit of time. After a while, I stopped thinking of my subjects as landscape and started thinking of them as portraits. This is what separates my project from being


CallOfTheWild_2015_2016
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