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CallOfTheWild_2015_2016

“I love how light and dark work together to create a different kind of beauty, a tonal beauty. I only use two colors—black and white—but I try to get as much out of them as I can.” – Shelley Reed Call of the Wild Magazine | 2015–16 35 The images are also a little disconcerting. There are moments when the animals are interacting with each other and moments when they are looking straight out at the viewer—sometimes with aggression, sometimes with fear. Throughout, there is a tension between the wild and the cultured, between good and evil, between beauty and destruction. It is a multi-layered message. “We humans can do wonderful things as well as terrible things,” says Reed. “In Dubious Battle is, basically, a commentary on humans’ nature.” A commentary. An observation. Depending on a viewer’s interpretation, a critique. Why does she work in black and white? “Color is seductive,” she says. “When something is colorful, sometimes that overpowers the rest of the picture.” Removing the color and creating a monochromatic image can help the viewer to see more clearly, to comprehend more deeply. “But it still presents a challenge to create works in which the viewer does not miss the color, to create enough to look at so the color is not perceived as something that is lacking,” Reed says. In Dubious Battle: Paintings by Shelley Reed will be on exhibit May 2 – August 23, 2015. The corresponding In Dubious Battle Mix’d Media event will be on Thursday, July 9, 6–9 pm. Visit WildlifeArt.org to learn more. In Dubious Battle (detail), © Shelley Reed


CallOfTheWild_2015_2016
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