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CallOfTheWild_2015_2016

40 BY SOFTENING THE WINGTIPS of their avian subjects, artists convey movement while simultaneously presenting a static image. Other artists in this section use methods discussed previously, such as including multiple creatures to represent different stages of a given motion. Richard Bishop’s Wingmead follows ten ducks landing on a pond. From the uppermost pair to those at the bottom, the progression of movement is easy to follow. As they descend, the ducks’ bodies begin to tilt up at a higher angle as their wings catch more air to slow them on their descent. Beyond the illustration of flight, many artists have taken on the additional challenge of depicting birds interacting with one another in mid-air. Raymond Harris-Ching’s Puffin and Young Herring Gulls captures three birds engaged in a midflight quarrel. Carl Brenders’ Without Warning conveys a scene often witnessed in the skies above the National Museum of Wildlife Art: that of a raven chasing off a larger predatory bird. CONCLUSION: THE ANIMAL’S VIEW In many of his short films, Sam Easterson shows us the world from an animal’s perspective. He attaches miniature cameras to creatures like bison and wolves and then records the world as they see it. Easterson works with animals in captivity or rehabilitation centers to generate these videos. In his other work, he inserts a tiny camera into an animal’s habitat, a burrow or a nest, to give us an intimate view of the animal in its environment. Easterson began making these films over a decade ago and received widespread acclaim, even appearing on The Late Show with David Letterman. His work has interesting parallels with the rise of reality television and the widespread use of helmet or body-mounted cameras to record human exploits. Advances in visual technology, from photography to video to tiny cameras, change the way we perceive the world around us. These advances also add to the range of tools artists are able to employ when rendering the actions of animals in art. From the earliest images created on cave walls to artists working with the latest digital media, the actions and interactions of animals have been a staple of the visual arts. These interpretations reflect the worldviews of the cultures that produced them; they are closely tied to advances in knowledge in other realms of society. Fight or Flight presents a variety of work from the late 18th-century to today, representing different takes on animal motion and different ways of understanding this dynamic and everevolving subject. Fight or Flight: Art, Action, Animals will be on exhibit January 24 – August 29, 2015. Visit WildlifeArt.org to view more artwork and to learn more. Images of the Installation of Fight or Flight at the National Museum of Wildlife Art


CallOfTheWild_2015_2016
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