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CallOfTheWild_2015_2016

4 National Museum of Wildlife Art | WildlifeArt.org A Higher Level “…the art in this building conveys a history of ideas, for example about our relationships with the Other, the free animal, the essence of what is foreign to us. But this work is on display here because of a consensus about its intrinsic worth.” – Barry Lopez, speaking about the National Museum of Wildlife Art, October 12, 2014 t the National Museum of Wildlife Art, we believe that experiences with wildlife art change personal perceptions of nature, provide shared understanding between cultures and encourage conservation of the natural world. For an art museum, the task is not merely collecting and preserving, but telling the story about how the visions of artists affect human perceptions of animals. Without art, how many people would even know about elephants, rhinos, grizzly bears, horned toads, bald eagles or bison? Without art, how many of those species would already be extinct? The National Museum of Wildlife Art is situated in Jackson Hole, Wyoming—one of the few places in the country where people see moose, elk, grizzly bears and bald eagles on a regular basis. Our singular art collection includes some 5,000 paintings, sculptures and other fine-art works that represent centuries of the human passion to portray wild animals. Those concerned with the natural world regularly convene here to be inspired by the passion that fine artists devote to wildlife. During the past decade, the Museum has created and organized traveling exhibits in over 25 cities across the nation, shipping hundreds of artworks to sister museums. We have also published award-winning books and catalogs, and created countless programs and tours to produce memorable experiences for visitors. The crux of visitor experience is the recognition that everyone has some familiarity with artworks that depict animals. The cover illustration of an outdoor magazine, a photograph of an elk taped to the refrigerator door, a childhood copy of Beatrix Potter stories or even a regular evening stroll past the sculptures at the gate of a local park would all qualify. In this fashion, visitors themselves become actors in the Museum’s commitment to build a better understanding of humanity’s relationships with nature. The results of these efforts will be to fulfill the vision statement of the Museum, to make it the significant resource for people seeking the connection between art and wildlife. In today’s world, such a resource will house a unique and significant collection of art, be prepared to share that collection and information about the art and artists with people on a global basis, and function as part of a dynamic and growing network of students, researchers, artists, collectors and visitors who believe that art changes our ability to see and understand the world. James C. McNutt, President & CEO James C. McNutt, President & CEO


CallOfTheWild_2015_2016
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